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What do cancerous uterine polyps look like?

By Zaira Salvador.
Last Update: 03/08/2018

Apparently, they are no different in color or texture. However, some studies have found an association between endometrial thickening, the size of polyps, and the chances for them to become cancerous—the larger the polyp, the greater endometrial thickness and subsequently the higher the chances for them to be cancerous.

Suggested for you: Uterine Polyps & Cancer Risk – Can They Become Cancerous?.

 Zaira Salvador
Zaira Salvador
BSc, MSc
Embryologist
Bachelor's Degree in Biotechnology from the Technical University of Valencia (UPV). Biotechnology Degree from the National University of Ireland en Galway (NUIG) and embryologist specializing in Assisted Reproduction, with a Master's Degree in Biotechnology of Human Reproduction from the University of Valencia (UV) and the Valencian Infertility Institute (IVI)
License: 3185-CV
Embryologist. Bachelor's Degree in Biotechnology from the Technical University of Valencia (UPV). Biotechnology Degree from the National University of Ireland en Galway (NUIG) and embryologist specializing in Assisted Reproduction, with a Master's Degree in Biotechnology of Human Reproduction from the University of Valencia (UV) and the Valencian Infertility Institute (IVI) License: 3185-CV.
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