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What kind of results do we get from female infertility treatments?

By Michelle Lorraine Embleton B.Sc. Ph.D. (biochemist).
Last Update: 05/31/2024

Michelle Emblenton, a biochemist at inviTRA, talks about the results of fertility treatments:

Well, the results we get generally depend on four main factors, and these are age, the ovarian reserve, the particular laboratory and the gynecologist who has carried out the process. The age of the patient is possibly one of the most important factors for predicting the results of fertility treatment. With the more advanced the maternal age, the less success rates there are. The ovarian reserve is important, but not to such a degree. With a lower ovarian reserve you can undergo several follicular punctures to build up a reserve of egg cells. When we think about the laboratory, this is where the fertilization process will take place and the embryos grow. So, obviously, it is important. Embryos are generally grown for 5 days (up to blastocist stage) before being transferred. And, using pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, generally can increase the chances of success in the treatment, because we know that these embryos don't have any genetic abnormalities or problems that could result in the future embryo not implanting and developing properly. Last but not least, the gynecologist. Studies have shown that, in any particular fertility clinic, there could be up to 15% difference in the success rates between one gynecologist and another. Fertility treatments can be complex processes and many steps are needed to be performed in a way that is timed correctly and with a good relation between the patient and the gynecologist. Having this good patient-doctor communication really does help improve the success of your treatment.

 Michelle Lorraine Embleton
Michelle Lorraine Embleton
B.Sc. Ph.D.
Biochemist
PhD in Biochemistry, University of Bristol, UK, specialising in DNA : protein intereactions. BSc honours degree in Molecular Biology, Univerisity of Bristol. Translation and editing of scientific and medical literature.
Biochemist. PhD in Biochemistry, University of Bristol, UK, specialising in DNA : protein intereactions. BSc honours degree in Molecular Biology, Univerisity of Bristol. Translation and editing of scientific and medical literature.