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After Chlamydia trachomatis infection, will tubal infertility develop?

By Dr. Mónica Aura Masip (gynecologist).
Last Update: 12/31/2021

Changes in sexual behavior, as well as the increase in the frequency of intercourse, the number of sexual partners and the use of contraceptive methods (not necessarily condoms) expose couples to a higher incidence of sexually transmitted diseases causing tubo-peritoneal infections, with consequences on fertility. The most frequent are Chlamydia and gonococcus.

Chlamydia trachomatis is a pathogen that has been isolated in most women with tubal infertility, with high titers of anti-Chlamydia antibodies being detected in more than 70% of women with tubal obstruction.

Its clinical spectrum ranges from asymptomatic infections to severe infections that are difficult to treat. The structural alterations associated with Chlamydia trachomatis infection are due to inflammation mediated by tissue damage and injury that occurs after chronic or repeated infections.

Read the full article on: Tubal Factor Infertility – Causes & Treatment ( 62).
Dr. Mónica  Aura Masip
Dr. Mónica Aura Masip
MD, MSc
Gynecologist
Dr. Mónica Aura has a degree in Medicine and General Surgery from the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB). She is also a specialist in Gynecology and Obstetrics from the Hospital de Santa Creu y Sant Pau and has a Master's degree in Human Assisted Reproduction from the University Juan Carlos I of Madrid and another in Health Center Management from the UB.
Licence number: 31588
Gynecologist. Dr. Mónica Aura has a degree in Medicine and General Surgery from the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB). She is also a specialist in Gynecology and Obstetrics from the Hospital de Santa Creu y Sant Pau and has a Master's degree in Human Assisted Reproduction from the University Juan Carlos I of Madrid and another in Health Center Management from the UB. Licence number: 31588.