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Is it possible to become a mother after pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)?

By Carolina González Arboleya M. D. (gynecologist).
Last Update: 04/12/2022

The answer in general is yes. Usually, the pelvic inflammatory disease presents as a complication of a sexually transmitted infection, affecting the internal genital tract of women. PID usually occurs when sexually transmitted bacteria spread from the vagina to the uterus, fallopian tubes, or ovaries. There are many types of bacteria that can cause pelvic inflammatory disease, but Neisseria Gonorrhoeae or Chlamydia infections are the most common. These bacteria are usually spread during sex without a barrier method.

The signs and symptoms of the pelvic inflammatory disease can be very mild or subtle. In fact, a significant percentage of women never experience any type of sign or symptom. As a result, the patient may not be aware of this condition until she has difficulty getting pregnant or develops some type of chronic pelvic pain.

The fertility-related problem that can result from pelvic inflammatory disease is primarily tubal disease, which can complicate spontaneous pregnancy or assisted reproductive techniques. When the pelvic inflammatory disease affects the proper functioning of the fallopian tubes, the pregnancy rate may decrease and the risk of ectopic gestation may be increased.

In addition, the fact that the tubes do not function properly often leads to the accumulation of fluid in them, which has been shown to be detrimental to implantation and proper embryo development.

This is why in the case of dysfunctional fallopian tubes in a patient seeking pregnancy we would have to consider removing them before performing an embryo transfer. This surgery is the "bilateral salpingectomy": it is normally performed laparoscopically and requires general anesthesia. It is usually simple and of short duration and major complications are rare.

 Carolina González Arboleya
Carolina González Arboleya
M. D.
Gynecologist
Dr. Carolina González has a degree in Medicine and Surgery from the University of Santiago de Compostela. Currently, Dr. González is doing a Master in Assisted Reproduction by the Technological University TECH and another one in Aesthetic, regenerative and anti-aging medicine by the Complutense University of Madrid.
Member number: 282875780
Gynecologist. Dr. Carolina González has a degree in Medicine and Surgery from the University of Santiago de Compostela. Currently, Dr. González is doing a Master in Assisted Reproduction by the Technological University TECH and another one in Aesthetic, regenerative and anti-aging medicine by the Complutense University of Madrid. Member number: 282875780.